BIOEMTECH introduces the first generation of fillable mouse and rat phantoms, designed mainly for nuclear medicine (PET/SPECT) applications, with potential to be extended to other imaging modalities too.

  • The fillable phantoms allow easy and reproducible evaluation of preclinical imaging systems and assessment of demanding imaging protocols. They are easily filled with any radioisotope, providing a very good model of rodents’ geometry, which cannot be approached using standard phantoms.
  • The fillable phantoms allow an accurate simulation of complicated experimental setups, without the need to use actual rodents. All costs related to animal use and preparation, order and use of radiopharmaceuticals suitable for animal administration are minimized, since pure isotopes can be used to mimic an animal study, at known concentrations.
  • Very specific biodistributions and kinetics can be extensively studied, without the arbitrariness related to a living animal.Besides its practical value, the fillable phantoms are in compliance with bioethics and 3Rs principle!
1,100€
Transport case Two 28gr mice 1 pipette 1 USB Manual
2,200€
Transport case Two 250gr rats 1 pipette 1 USB Manual
2,800€
Transport case Two 250gr rats 1 pipette 1 USB Manual Two 28gr mice
Can contain a different set of phantoms or different sizes upon request transport case 1 pipette 1 USB

About the phantom

  • The fillable mouse phantom is based on Digimouse, published by Dogdas et al in 2007.

  • It is a model of a 28g mouse extracted from anatomical and cryosection data.

  • The material is compatible to tissue and non sensitive to magnetic fields.

  • It contains major organs (brain, thyroid, heart, liver, kidneys, bladder) and two tumors.

  • All organs/tumors can be easily, separately filled with isotopes.

  • The rat phantom is based on a modification of the same model.

  • Different sizes and animal positions are possible, upon request.

Suggested applications

  • Study very specific biodistributions without the arbitrariness related to a living animal.
  • Reproducible assessment of different imaging protocols, using known concentrations
  • Establishment of protocols for less frequently used isotopes
  • Assessment of collimator penetration or positron range that deteriorate imaging quality
  • Optimization of protocols for multiple isotope imaging
  • Detection of low activities at the presence of high concentration in nearby organs
  • Effect of different ratios between organs/tumors on the imaging performance
  • Optimization of protocols for multiple simultaneous mouse imaging
  • Evaluation of image reconstruction and correction algorithms.